Sewanee, Tennessee and the University of the South

It only takes one ride or walk along Sewanee’s University Avenue to realize you have arrived in a special place, dominated by the Gothic-style scholastic buildings of the University of the South.

The Episcopal university was founded in 1857, and the cornerstone for the first building was laid in 1860. The University’s planned opening was delayed by the Civil War and finally opened 1868. The University has grown through the tumultuous periods of Reconstruction, The Great Depression, two World Wars, and the social changes that opened full and equal educational opportunities to women and to all nationalities.

Today, the university has an enrollment of 1500 students and provides curricula in the arts, sciences, and theology, conferring bachelors, masters and doctorate degrees.

We spent the afternoon walking around the campus, photographing some of the more impressive buildings. Two of the older buildings are the Luke Residence Hall and Luke Chapel.Luke Residence Hall (left) and Luke Chapel are among the older buildings on campus.

Luke Residence Hall (left) and Luke Chapel are among the older buildings on campus.

Farther down the street are the All Saints Chapel, Shapard Tower and the Quadrangle. Inspiration for the rose window in the All Saints Chapel was drawn from the south transept of Notre Dame de Paris in France.

All Saint's Chapel Chapel and Shapard Tower

All Saint’s Chapel Chapel and Shapard Tower

The close-up of the All Saint’s Rose and the south transept of Notre Dame de Paris in France shows the similarity of the designs.

The rose of All Saint's Chapel (left) and the south transept of Notre Dame de Paris in France

The rose of All Saint’s Chapel (left) and the south transept of Notre Dame de Paris in France

The Dining Hall-sThe McClurg Dining Hall is an impressive site. This 42,000-square-ft building houses two dining rooms; one seats 450, the other 250. There are also four meeting/dining rooms, the kitchen, and an outdoor dining area.

The Memorial Cross in Sewanee, Tennessee

The Memorial Cross in Sewanee, Tennessee

About half a mile from the center of town, at the end of Tennessee Avenue is the Memorial Cross. Constructed in 1922 as a memorial to honor students from the University of the South and all from Franklin County, Tennessee who served in the armed services. Plaques around the base honor those who served in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Viet Nam War and Desert Storm. The 60-ft tall cross stands on a high bluff overlooking Franklin County.

Gallery

About/Contents Entry
Photos and comments from a recent visit to Sewanee, Tennessee, home of The University of the South, specifically to look at the architecture of several of the more impressive buildings.

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This entry was posted in Renaissance Bucket List and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Sewanee, Tennessee and the University of the South

  1. Pingback: Renaissance Musings Table of Contents | Renaissance Musings

  2. kevinhunt says:

    Beautiful pictures!

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