Mammoth Cave, Kentucky

Day #1 (Continued) – Travel as I Have Envisioned It Could Be!

Shortly after leaving Bowling Green and the Corvette Museum, we saw signs to Mammoth Cave, also in Kentucky, and decided that we had time to at least go to the Visitor’ Center and get some information. We probably would not have time for a cave tour.Mammoth Cave Approaching the Visitor's Center

At Mammoth Cave, we spent time in the Visitor’s Center, purchased a few souvenirs, and walked through the grounds around the entrance to the cave. The park offers several different guided tours, both shorter and longer cave tours, as well as woodland and birding guided tours.

DSC_0092

In the Visitor’s Center, visitors get information and purchase tickets for various tours.

There is a campground suitable for tents to motor homes within walking distance of the cave entrance. It is very likely we will schedule several days at Mammoth Cave later this year.

I should point out that we have the “America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass,” also call the “Senior Pass.” This grants access to most National Parks, Monuments, Historical Sites and Forests. This make it possible to simply drive into a park for an hour or two without having to pay entry fees.

DSC_0091

This Bridge Leads to the Cave Entrance

The Senior Pass currently costs $20.00 and can be purchased at many National Parks or ordered online. For more information, go to the USGS Store ( https://store.usgs.gov/senior-pass ). Considering that it costs $30.00 for a seven-day pass in most major National Parks, the Senior Pass, which does not expire, is an excellent investment, and it is good for all occupants in the vehicle—if Grandma has her Senior Pass, everyone gets in on her pass!

Tomorrow, we finally get to leave the camper at the factory for service, but that will provide an opportunity for more adventure.

Previous: Corvette Museum, Bowling Green, Kentucky

Next : Birthplace of Our Time and Travel Machine

Gallery

 

 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Natural History, Renaissance Bucket List, travel and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s